Author Topic: Walking around corfu  (Read 53086 times)

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Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #270 on: September 06, 2019, 09:03:56 AM »


Hi

If you walk around Arillas and see a field or roadside with lots of white flowers this is it

Wild Carrot

Daucus carota  Common names include wild carrot, bird's nest, bishop's lace, and Queen Anne's lace
 is a white, flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to temperate regions of Europe and southwest Asia, and naturalized to North America and Australia.
Domesticated carrots are cultivars of a subspecies, Daucus carota subsp. sativus.
The wild carrot is a herbaceous, somewhat variable biennial plant that grows between 30 and 60 cm tall, and is roughly hairy, with a stiff, solid stem. The leaves are tripinnate, finely divided and lacy, . The flowers are small and dull white, clustered in flat, dense umbels. The umbels are terminal and approximately 3–4 inches (8–10 cm) wide. As the seeds develop, the umbel curls up at the edges, becomes more congested, and develops a concave surface.
Like the cultivated carrot, the D. carota root is edible while young, but it quickly becomes too woody to consume.
Extra caution should be used when collecting D. carota because it bears a close resemblance to poison hemlock. In addition, the leaves of the wild carrot may cause phytophotodermatitis, so caution should also be used when handling the plant.
Phytophotodermatitis, also known as berloque dermatitis or margarita photodermatitis, is a cutaneous phototoxic inflammatory reaction resulting from contact with a light-sensitizing botanical agent followed by exposure to ultraviolet light (from the sun, for instance).
This beneficial weed can be used as a companion plant to crops. Like most members of the umbellifer family, it attracts wasps to its small flowers in its native land; however, where it has been introduced, it attracts very few wasps. In northeast Wisconsin, when introduced with blueberries it did succeed in attracting butterflies and wasps. This species is also documented to boost tomato plant production when kept nearby, and it can provide a microclimate of cooler, moister air for lettuce, when intercropped with it. However, the states of Iowa, Ohio, Michigan and Washington have listed it as a noxious weed,and it is considered a serious pest in pastures. It persists in the soil seed bank for two to five years.
Allegedly they are orange for entirely political reasons: in the 17th century, Dutch growers are thought to have cultivated orange carrots as a tribute to William of Orange – who led the the struggle for Dutch independence – and the color stuck. ... All our modern, western carrots ultimately descend from these varieties

Habitat
This mainly coastal plant is a summer wildflower of dry grassland; it can be seen in swathes on the verges of country lanes, field boundaries and sheltered grassy cliffs and dunes near the sea.
Daucus is an ancient Greek name for this plant, and the specific pithet carota simply means carrot.



 

Toxicity. Skin contact with the foliage of Daucus carota, especially wet foliage, can cause skin irritation in some people.

Eating only a tiny bit of the toxins found in poison hemlock can cause death. Poison-hemlock can be confused with wild carrot (Daucus carota, or Queen Anne's Lace), as with many other members of the parsley family that resemble it. While poison hemlock is similar to wild carrot, their differences are numerous.




Like the cultivated carrot, the D. carota root is edible while young, but it quickly becomes too woody to consume. The flowers are sometimes battered and fried. The leaves are also edible except in large quantities.
 It is used in perfumery and as a food flavouring. The oil has also been used cosmetically in anti-wrinkle creams.
Carrot essential oil is warming and reviving. It is good for problem skin, including overheated and irritated skin and also the best essential oil known for caring for mature skinmature skin.

Carrot seed essential oil does not have an especially pleasant scent and is therefore best blended with other more acceptable oils such as Frankincense or Neroli. It is believed to stimulate the red blood cells, adding tone and elasticity to the skin. It is also known for its regenerative powers after severe burns.

 carrot essential oil originates from within the UK and is extracted by steam distillation of the dried fruit (seeds).

Carrot essential oil is a member of the Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) family and is also referred to as wild carrot, queen annes lace or birds nest. Carrot essential oil blends well with cedarwood, lemon, geranium, orange, cinnamon, clove bud, grapefruit, ginger and mandarin.



The wild carrot is an aromatic herb that acts as a diuretic, soothes the digestive tract and stimulates the uterus. A wonderfully cleansing medicine, it supports the liver, stimulates the flow of urine and the removal of waste by the kidneys. The whole plant is anthelmintic, carminative, deobstruent, diuretic, galactogogue, ophthalmic, stimulant. An infusion is used in the treatment of various complaints including digestive disorders, kidney and bladder diseases and in the treatment of dropsy. An infusion of the leaves has been used to counter cystitis and kidney stone formation, and to diminish stones that have already formed. Carrot leaves contain significant amounts of porphyrins, which stimulate the pituitary gland and lead to the release of increased levels of sex hormones. The plant is harvested in July and dried for later use. A warm water infusion of the flowers has been used in the treatment of diabetes. The grated raw root, especially of the cultivated forms, is used as a remedy for threadworms. The root is also used to encourage delayed menstruation. The root of the wild plant can induce uterine contractions and so should not be used by pregnant women. A tea made from the roots is diuretic and has been used in the treatment of urinary stones. The seeds are diuretic, carminative, emmenagogue and anthelmintic. An infusion is used in the treatment of oedema, flatulent indigestion and menstrual problems. The seed is a traditional "morning after" contraceptive and there is some evidence to uphold this belief. It requires further investigation. Carrot seeds can be abortifacient and so should not be used by pregnant women.










Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #271 on: September 08, 2019, 12:05:14 PM »


HI

prickly dandelion

You will see this plant all over Arillas

Sonchus asper Common names are prickly sow-thistle, prickly dandelion,rough milk thistle,spiny sowthistle, sharp-fringed sow thistle, and spiny-leaved sow thistle,
Kingdom:   Plantae
Clade:   Angiosperms
Clade:   Eudicots
Clade:   Asterids
Order:   Asterales
Family:   Asteraceae
Tribe:   Cichorieae
Genus:   Sonchus
Species:   S. asper
Sonchus asper is an annual or biennial herb sometimes reaching a height of 200 cm. with spiny leaves and yellow flowers resembling those of the dandelion.
The leaves are bluish-green, simple, lanceolate, with wavy and sometimes lobed margins, covered in spines on both the margins and beneath. The base of the leaf surrounds the stem.
The leaves and stems emit a milky sap when cut. One plant will produce several flat-topped arrays of flower heads, each head containing numerous yellow ray flowers but no disc flowers
Sonchus asper is native to Europe, North Africa, and western Asia. It has also become naturalized on other continents and is regarded as a noxious, invasive weed in many places. Its edible leaves make a palatable and nutritious leaf vegetable
Habitat
This is a wildflower of urban roadsides, wasteland, arable field margins and other disturbed ground.Mature sow thistle stems can range from 30 cm to 2 m (1 to 6 feet) tall, depending upon species and growing conditions. Colouration ranges from green to purple in older plants.
Flowering time
Prickly sow-thistle flowers from June to October.
Sonchus is a genus of about 60-90 species that contains annual, biennial and perennial herbs. Its main diversity occurs in Africa, the Mediterranean region and the mid-Atlantic archipelagos, but it also comprises woody species endemic to Macaronesia, and several cosmopolitan weedy species






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The sow thistle was introduced to North America from Europe. Edible parts: The leaves, flowers and roots are edible. These are best consumed when the plant is young because the older it gets the more bitter it becomes. Once it becomes bitter you can cook with it or mix it with pleasant tasting greens.
 In the Mediterranean region and South-East Asia use of Sonchus asper as a vegetable is widespread,



The plant is emmenagogue and hepatic. An infusion has been used to bring on a tardy menstruation and to treat diarrhoea. The latex in the sap is used in the treatment of warts. It is also said to have anticancer activity.
The stem juice is a powerful hydrogogue and cathartic, it should be used with great caution since it can cause colic and tenesmus. The gum has been used as a cure for the opium habit. The leaves are applied as a poultice to inflammatory swellings. An infusion of the leaves and roots is febrifuge and tonic.



Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #272 on: September 10, 2019, 09:09:04 AM »


HI

Hemlock

Conium maculatum the hemlock or poison hemlock, is a highly poisonous biennial herbaceous flowering plant in the carrot family Apiaceae, native to Europe and North Africa. A hardy plant capable of living in a variety of environments, hemlock is widely naturalized in locations outside its native range, such as parts of North and South America, Australia and West Asia to which it has been introduced.
Conium comes from the Ancient Greek κώνειον – kṓneion: "hemlock". This may be related to konas (meaning to whirl), in reference to vertigo, one of the symptoms of ingesting the plant
Conium maculatum is known by several common names. In addition to the British hemlock, the Australian carrot fern and the Irish devil's bread or devil's porridge, the following names are also used: poison parsley, spotted corobane, spotted hemlock, and poison hemlock. The dried stems are sometimes called kecksies or kex
Conium maculatum is an herbaceous biennial flowering plant that grows to 1.5–2.5 m (5–8 ft) tall, with a smooth, green, hollow stem, usually spotted or streaked with red or purple on the lower half of the stem. All parts of the plant are hairless (glabrous); the leaves are two- to four-pinnate, finely divided and lacy
 overall triangular in shape, up to 50 cm (20 in) long and 40 cm (16 in) broad. Although it looks like a carrot plant, poison hemlock can be distinguished by the smooth texture and light green color it possesses. The poison hemlock's flower is small and white. The flowers are loosely clustered and each flower has five petals
HABITAT
Conium maculatum grows in damp areas, but also on drier rough grassland, roadsides and disturbed ground.
Poison hemlock flourishes in the spring, when most other forage is gone. All plant parts are poisonous, but once the plant is dried, the poison is greatly reduced, although not gone completely
Kingdom:   Plantae
Clade:   Angiosperms
Clade:   Eudicots
Clade:   Asterids
Order:   Apiales
Family:   Apiaceae
Genus:   Conium
Species:   C. maculatum








Hemlock contains conhydrine, N-methylconine, but its most poisonous alkaloid is coniine, which has a chemical structure similar to nicotine. This poison disrupts the central nervous system—a small dose can cause respiratory collapse. Death can result from blockage of the neuromuscular junction caused by coniine.
Hemlock poisoning can be fatal, and there is no antidote. Symptoms can begin showing as early as 30 minutes after ingesting the plant. The severity of your poisoning depends on how much hemlock is in your system and how toxic the plant was at the time of ingestion.
The most important identification feature of poison hemlock are the stems and stalks. They are hairless, hollow, and almost always have distinctive purplish-red splotching or streaking on them, especially towards the base of the plant. These markings are a sure giveaway that it is poison hemlock.
It is a common misconception that poison hemlock sap will cause skin rashes and blisters. In fact, poison hemlock toxins must be ingested or enter through the eyes, cuts, or other openings to cause poisoning.
Children: Use of hemlock is UNSAFE and can be fatal, especially in children. Children can be poisoned by even small amounts of hemlock. Some children have died after eating leaves or using hollow hemlock stems as peashooters, flutes, or whistles. Hemlock should not be used for treating pain in children due to teething.






UNKNOWN-NONE



Hemlock is a very poisonous plant that has a long history of medicinal use, though it is very rarely used in modern herbalism. It is a narcotic plant that sedates and relieves pain. The plant contains coniine, an extremely toxic substance that can also cause congenital defects. The whole plant is analgesic, antispasmodic, emetic, galactofuge and sedative. It is a traditional folk treatment for cancer and was formerly widely used internally in very small doses to treat a variety of complaints including tumours, epilepsy, whooping cough, rabies and as an antidote to strychnine poisoning. It is still used externally, usually in ointments and oils, in the treatment of mastitis, malignant tumours (especially breast cancer) anal fissure and haemorrhoids. The leaves and stems should be harvested when the first fruits are forming, since they are then at their most active medicinally. The fruits are gathered either when fully ripe, or before they turn from green to yellow, and are then dried. Because of the extremely toxic nature of this herb, it is seldom employed nowadays. Use with extreme caution and only under the guidance of a qualified practitioner. A homeopathic remedy is prepared from a tincture of the fresh plant, harvested when in flower. It is used for treating complaints such as dizziness, coughs, insomnia, exhaustion, arteriosclerosis and prostate problems.






Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #273 on: September 11, 2019, 09:16:06 AM »



HI

mulberries

Morus, a genus of flowering plants in the family Moraceae, comprises 10–16 species of deciduous trees commonly known as mulberries, growing wild and under cultivation in many temperate world regions.
Mulberries are fast-growing when young, but soon become slow-growing and rarely exceed 10–15 m
The closely related genus Broussonetia is also commonly known as mulberry, notably the paper mulberry, Broussonetia papyrifera
The trees can be monoecious or dioecious.
"Dioecious" and "monoecious" are terms that refer to plant reproduction. ... Dioecious describes a plant group that includes distinct male and female plants. Monoecious describes a single plant that bears both male and female flowers. The pronunciation for the two words is dahy-EE-shuhs and muh-NEE-shuhs
 fruits are white, green, or pale yellow. In most species, the fruit turn pink and then red while ripening, then dark purple or black, and have a sweet flavor when fully ripe. The fruit of the white-fruited cultivar are white when ripe; the fruit of this cultivar are also sweet, but have a mild flavor compared with darker varieties.[citation needed] Although quite similar looking, they are not to be confused with blackberries.
The taxonomy of Morus is complex and disputed. Over 150 species names have been published, and although differing sources may cite different selections of accepted names, only 10–16 are generally cited as being accepted by the vast majority of botanical authorities. Morus classification is even further complicated by widespread hybridisation, wherein the hybrids are fertile.
Black, red, and white mulberries are widespread in Southern Europe,
Black mulberry was imported to Britain in the 17th century in the hope that it would be useful in the cultivation of silkworms.
Mulberries are also widespread in Greece, particularly in the Peloponnese, which in the Middle Ages was known as Morea, deriving from the Greek word for the tree (μουριά, mouria).
Mulberries can be grown from seed, and this is often advised, as seedling-grown trees are generally of better shape and health,
HABITAT
Morus  commonly invades old fields, roadsides, forest edges, urban environments, and other disturbed areas. It prefers a warm, moist, well-drained loamy soil in a sunny position.
Mulberry leaves, particularly those of the white mulberry, are ecologically important as the sole food source of the silkworm (Bombyx mori, named after the mulberry genus Morus), the cocoon of which is used to make silk. The wild silk moth also eats mulberry.
Paper
During the Angkorian age of the Khmer Empire of Southeast Asia, monks at Buddhist temples made paper from the bark of mulberry trees. The paper was used to make books, known as kraing.
Fossils of Morus are reported from the Pliocene of the Netherlands
The Pliocene Epoch in the geologic timescale that extends from 5.333 million to 2.58 million years BP. It is the second and youngest epoch of the Neogene Period in the Cenozoic Era. The Pliocene follows the Miocene Epoch and is followed by the Pleistocene Epoch.

Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush is an English nursery rhyme and singing game. It has a Roud Folk Song Index  The same tune is also used for "Lazy Mary, Will You Get Up" and "Nuts in May". A variant is used for "The Wheels on the Bus".
The rhyme was first recorded by James Orchard Halliwell as an English children's game in the mid-19th century. He noted that there was a similar game with the lyrics "Here we go round the bramble bush". The bramble bush may be an earlier version, possibly changed because of the difficulty of the alliteration, since mulberries do not grow on bushes.

The most common modern version of the rhyme is:

Here we go round the mulberry bush,
The mulberry bush,
The mulberry bush.
Here we go round the mulberry bush
On a cold and frosty morning.


This is the way we wash our face,
Wash our face,
Wash our face.
This is the way we wash our face
On a cold and frosty morning.

This is the way we comb our hair,
Comb our hair,
Comb our hair.
This is the way we comb our hair
On a cold and frosty morning.

This is the way we brush our teeth,
Brush our teeth,
Brush our teeth.
This is the way we brush our teeth
On a cold and frosty morning.

This is the way we put on our clothes,
Put on our clothes,
Put on our clothes.
This is the way we put on our clothes
On a cold and frosty morning.

Here we go round the mulberry bush,
The mulberry bush,
The mulberry bush.
Here we go round the mulberry bush
On a cold and frosty morning.

“Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush” is often sung as part of a children's game. ... Duncan, a former governor of England's Wakefield Prison, the song originated with that 420-year-old institution's female prisoners, who were exercised around a mulberry tree.
/size]




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Fruit is especially large and succulent with an intense, rich flavour. It can be eaten fresh, in preserves or made into wine. The white mulberry (Morus alba) is also grown for its fruits but is considered to have fruit of inferior quality to the black mulberry (M. nigra) when grown in the UK.
They carry colorful berries — most commonly black, white, or red — that are often made into wine, fruit juice, tea, jam, or canned foods, but can also be dried and eaten as a snack.
We usually think of mulberries either in terms of their fruit (black mulberry) or their leaves (white mulberry), used to feed silk worms -- or indeed their ornamental beauty as trees. But for centuries mulberry wood has been highly prized by makers of cabinets, bowls and functional and decorative objects.
(Morus alba) are also the primary food source for the silkworm (Bombyx mori), which is used to produce silk



White mulberry is often tried in order to help treat diabetes. It is also tried for treating high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, the common cold and its symptoms, muscle and joint pain such as from arthritis, constipation, dizziness, ringing in the ears, hair loss, and premature graying.
Mulberries are rich in many vitamins and minerals, particularly vitamin C and iron:
Vitamin C. An essential vitamin that is important for skin health and various bodily functions .
Iron. ...
Vitamin K1. ...
Potassium. ...
Vitamin E. An antioxidant that protects against oxidative damage
Improve Blood Sugar Control
Lower Cholesterol
Reduce Cancer Risk








Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #274 on: September 11, 2019, 10:07:09 AM »


HI

Near the Tria Adelphia outside is a bus stop shelter the field behind the shelter is covered with Squirting Cucumber Its Latin name Ecballium elaterium is from the Greek ‘ekballein,’ meaning to throw out and refers to the ejection of the seeds from the fruit when it ripens.

THIS WAS TAKEN SEP 2017


THIS WAS TAKEN AUG 2019


This shows how fast these plants can grow in the right conditions
Squirting cucumber is a fragile vine with small greenish-yellow flowers that haunts marshes, sandy roadsides and low woods. Blossoms are bisexual and symmetrical. Often found along railroad tracks, this herbaceous plant of the gourd family has thick, haired stems on a plant that spreads to about 24 inches across.
Upon reaching maturity, the fruits explosively eject their brown seeds as they detach from the stem; the seeds may travel 3 to 6 metres (about 10 to 20 feet) from the plant. squirting cucumberThe unusual seed dispersal of the squirting cucumber (Ecballium elaterium).
Squirting cucumber contains poisonous cucurbitacins, and all parts of the plant can be fatal if ingested. ... squirting cucumberThe unusual seed dispersal of the squirting cucumber (Ecballium elaterium).






Offline Eggy

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #275 on: September 11, 2019, 10:37:30 AM »
We had a "mini plague" , of these squirters , a few years back and were advised to wear gloves and glasses when digging them up.
and....... not to put them in the composter!!!! - Nasty things and they do spit at you.
Cheers
Negg
Boro,Boris,Bori-I can, you can, he can. and can you-Boris?

Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #276 on: September 12, 2019, 09:06:21 AM »



HI

Deadly Nightshade

Belladonna or deadly Nightshade Are the common names for Atropa belladonna is a perennial herbaceous plant in the nightshade family Solanaceae, which includes tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplant (aubergine). It is native to Europe, North Africa, and Western Asia. Its distribution extends from Great Britain in the west to western Ukraine and the Iranian province of Gilan in the east. It is also naturalised or introduced in some parts of Canada and the United States.
The name "belladonna" comes from the Italian language, meaning 'beautiful lady'; originating either from its usage as a cosmetic to beautify pallid skin, or more probably, from its usage to increase the pupil size in women.
 Drops prepared from the belladonna plant were used to dilate women's pupils, an effect considered to be attractive and seductive.[5][6] Belladonna drops act as a muscarinic antagonist, blocking receptors in the muscles of the eye that constrict pupil size.
HABITAT
Atropa belladonna is native to Central and Southern Europe, as well as some parts of Asia. ... Atropa belladonna doesn't really have a preference as far as soil pH - it can grow in acidic, neutral, or basic soil. It will also grow in sandy, stony, or loamy soil.
It has a long history of use as a medicine, cosmetic, and poison. Before the Middle Ages, it was used as an anesthetic for surgery; the ancient Romans used it as a poison — the Roman empresses Livia Drusilla and Agrippina the Younger both were rumored to have used it for murder; and, predating this, it was used to make poison-tipped arrows.
The foliage and berries are extremely toxic when ingested, containing tropane alkaloids.[1][2] These toxins include atropine, scopolamine and hyoscyamine, which cause delirium and hallucinations,[1][2][3] and are also used as pharmaceutical anticholinergics. These tropane alkaloids appear to be common in the Solanaceae family, as they are also present in plants of the Brugmansia, Datura and Hyoscyamus genera, of the same family but in different subfamilies and tribes to the nightshade.
Atropa belladonna is a branching herbaceous perennial rhizomatous hemicryptophyte, often growing as a subshrub from a fleshy rootstock. Plants grow to 2 m (6.6 ft) tall with ovate leaves 18 cm (7.1 in) long. The bell-shaped flowers are dull purple with green tinges and faintly scented. The fruits are berries, which are green, ripening to a shiny black, and approximately 1.5 cm (0.59 in) in diameter. The berries are sweet and are consumed by animals that disperse the seeds in their droppings, even though they contain toxic alkaloids. There is a pale-yellow flowering form called Atropa belladonna var. lutea with pale yellow fruit.
Atropa belladonna is in the nightshade family (Solanaceae), which it shares with potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, jimsonweed, tobacco, wolfberry, and chili peppers. The common names for this species include belladonna, deadly nightshade, divale, dwale, banewort, devil's berries, death cherries, beautiful death, devil's herb, great morel, and dwayberry.







Atropa Belladona is a poisonous plant called deadly nightshade. It's a plant classified in the solanaceae family and its roots, leaves and fruits contain the belladonna alkaloids: atropine, hyocyamine, and scopolamine , responsible for the anticholinergic toxicity of the plant.
Ingesting just two to four berries from deadly nightshade can kill a child. Ten to 20 berries can kill an adult. ... Meet Atropa belladonna, more popularly known as deadly nightshade. The plant looks harmless enough, as its leaves are green and it grows up to 4 feet high
Symptoms of deadly nightshade poisoning include dilated pupils, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, headaches, confusion and convulsions.
Belladonna is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth. It contains chemicals that can be toxic. Side effects can include dry mouth, enlarged pupils, blurred vision, red dry skin, fever, fast heartbeat, inability to urinate or sweat, hallucinations, spasms, mental problems, convulsions, and coma.
Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor


Atropa belladonna perfume=https://www.shayandblue.com/atropa-belladonna-fragrance-100ml.html
Belladonna is used in ointments that are applied to the skin for joint pain, pain along the sciatic nerve, and general nerve pain.
Belladonna is also used as suppositories for hemorrhoids.


Belladonna has been used in herbal medicine for centuries as a pain reliever, muscle relaxer, and anti-inflammatory, and to treat menstrual problems, peptic ulcer disease, histaminic reaction, and motion sickness.
Though widely regarded as unsafe, belladonna is taken by mouth as a sedative, to stop bronchial spasms in asthma and whooping cough, and as a cold and hay fever remedy. It is also used for Parkinson's disease, colic, inflammatory bowel disease, motion sickness, and as a painkiller.
Belladonna Self Adhesive Plaster stimulates blood flow to relieve aches and pains. RECOMMENDED FOR: Muscular tension and strain, stiff neck and aching shoulders, sciatica, lumbago, rheumatism and back ache.








Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #277 on: September 13, 2019, 09:10:48 AM »


HI

Wild Mustard


Sinapis arvensis, the charlock mustard, field mustard, wild mustard or charlock, is an annual or winter annual plant of the genus Sinapis in the family Brassicaceae. It is found in the fields of North Africa, Asia and Europe.
Sinapis arvensis reaches on average 20–80 centimetres  of height, but under optimal conditions can exceed one metre. The stems are erect, branched and striated, with coarse spreading hairs especially near the base.
 It blooms from May to September, or May to August, in the UK. The inflorescence is a raceme made up of yellow flowers having four petals.
It contains chemicals of the class glucosinolates, including sinalbin. The seeds contain a plant hormone, Gibberellic acid, which effects the dormancy of the seeds
It is commonly known as charlock mustard, field mustard, wild mustard, or charlock.
The genus name Sinapis derives from the Greek word "sinapi" meaning 'mustard'. The species name arvensis is a Latin adjective meaning 'from/of the field'
Habitat
It grows in the plains and mountains, in pastures, fields, roadsides, waste places such as railways, tips and waste ground, and ruins, but mainly in cultivated places. It prefers calcareous soils in sunny places, at an altitude of 0–1,400 metres (0–4,593 ft) above sea level.
It is found in North Africa, within=Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia. Within Asia, it is found in Arabian Peninsula (in Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates), Armenia, Azerbaijan, the Caucasus, China, Georgia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Siberia, Syria, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. It is also found in tropical Pakistan. In eastern Europe, it is found within Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova and Ukraine. In middle Europe, it is in Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia and Switzerland. In northern Europe, in Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. In southeastern Europe, within Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Greece, Italy, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia and Slovenia. Also in southwestern Europe, it is found in France, Portugal and Spain.
The leaves of wild mustard are edible at the juvenile stage of the plant; they are usually boiled, such as in 18th century, in Dublin, where it was sold in the streets. During the Irish Potato Famine, wild mustard was a common famine food, even though it often caused stomach upset. Once the seeds are ground, they produce a kind of mustard.

common name of mustard? These are the plants what make the Yellow Brown and black stuff
 The scientific name of field mustard is Brassica rapa subsp oleifera. The scientific name of black mustard is Brassica nigra. The scientific name of brown mustard is Brassica juncea.






NONE BUT Wild mustard is highly invasive, and may be poisonous to livestock. Wild mustard is considered a noxious weed. Wild mustard can be a serious weed problem in spring cereals.




The leaves of wild mustard are edible at the juvenile stage of the plant;[8] they are usually boiled, such as in 18th century, in Dublin, where it was sold in the streets. During the Irish Potato Famine, wild mustard was a common famine food, even though it often caused stomach upset. Once the seeds are ground, they produce a kind of mustard
A type of oil can be extracted from the seed which has been used for lubricating machinery.
Somewhat hot, the young leaves are used as a flavouring in salads, where they add a piquant flavour. Older leaves are used as a potherb. It is best to use just the young shoots and leaves in the spring, older leaves are bitter.
A large plant can yield tens of thousands of seeds but other varieties have been chosen for use by the makers of mustard.
Other Brassicas, mainly mustards and rape.
Can look a little like Ragwort, pictured, but the smell of mustard should keep you safe.



An infusion of the seeds will relieve chronic bronchitis and confirmed rheumatism, and for a relaxed sore throat a gargle of Mustard Seed Tea
The plant is used in Bach flower remedies - the keywords for prescribing it are 'Black depression', 'Melancholia' and 'Gloom



Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #278 on: September 13, 2019, 10:27:53 AM »



No it is not déjà vu

HI

Mustard plant

Mild white mustard (Sinapis hirta)  black mustard (Brassica nigra)  brown mustard, Chinese mustard, Indian mustard, Oriental mustard (Brassica juncea),
The mustard plant is a plant species in the genera Brassica and Sinapis in the family Brassicaceae. Mustard seed is used as a spice. Grinding and mixing the seeds with water, vinegar, or other liquids creates the yellow condiment known as prepared mustard. The seeds can also be pressed to make mustard oil, and the edible leaves can be eaten as mustard greens.
 "Some of the earliest known documentation of mustard's use dates back to Sumerian and Sanskrit texts from 3000 BC".
 (Brassica nigra) is grown in Argentina, Chile, the US and some European countries.
Mild white mustard (Sinapis hirta) grows wild in North Africa, the Middle East, and Mediterranean Europe, and has spread farther by long cultivation;
(Brassica juncea), originally from the foothills of the Himalaya, is grown commercially in India, Canada, the United Kingdom, Denmark, and the US;
Habitats
fallow fields,Farms, And also= weedy meadows, thickets areas and roadsides,






NONE  Toxic to Horses


All The Different Kinds Of Mustards,oils,
Recent research has studied varieties of mustards with high oil contents for use in the production of biodiesel, a renewable liquid fuel similar to diesel fuel. The biodiesel made from mustard oil has good flow properties and cetane ratings. The leftover meal after pressing out the oil has also been found to be an effective pesticide
MUSTARD SEEDS (YELLOW, BROWN, BLACK)
Yellow mustard seeds (also known as white mustard seeds) are the most common and the mildest in flavor. The brown and black seeds tend to be more pungent and are used in varying degrees with yellow seeds to help create different varieties of mustard.
MUSTARD POWDER (CRACKED/DAL, YELLOW, CHINESE, ENGLISH)
These are just ground mustard seeds. You can find coarse grinds, but most preground mustard seeds are made into powder. Different brands or types will have different blends of seeds to get varying levels of heat. Mix the powder with vinegar or water until you have a paste, wait about 10-15 minutes for the oils and enzymes to work their magic, and boom, you’ve got homemade mustard.
Yellow Mustard: Aka “American mustard,” this gets its characteristically bright yellow color from turmeric. One of the milder mustards, it’s hugely popular in the U.S. and can be found at most backyard cookouts involving hot dogs or burgers. It’s commonly referred to as just “mustard” by most Americans.
Dijon: The classic French mustard, it’s been around since the 1850s, and originally it swapped in unripe grape juice for vinegar. Nowadays, dijon is made with “white wine.” While Dijon is a region of France that does in fact produce mustard, the term “Dijon” as it applies to mustard is not a protected food name like Champagne, and most Dijon mustard is made outside of France. A lot of recipes that call for mustard use Dijon, as it has a smooth consistency like yellow but a more complex, sharp flavor.
Spicy Brown: This uses a slightly coarser grind than yellow or Dijon and includes some of the spicier brown mustard seeds in addition to the standard yellow/white seeds. With more heat and deeper flavor than yellow mustard, this is a favorite in many delis, as well as the common New York City hot dog cart. If you’re having some pastrami on rye, this is the mustard you want.
OTHER WINE MUSTARDS (WHITE BURGUNDY, PINOT NOIR, CHAMPAGNE)
Similar to Dijon mustard, these use specific types of wine to give the mustard a specific flavor that is unique from standard Dijon (which usually lists the nondescript “white wine” as one of its ingredients). If you like Dijon, I highly recommend giving some of these a try.
OTHER INTERNATIONAL MUSTARDS (ENGLISH, GERMAN, CHINESE)
English: Nice and spicy, this has a bright yellow color like yellow American mustard, but waaaaaaay more bite. If you want some serious mustard heat on your sandwich, this is what you should go for.

German: A bit like Dijon, but with a little more heat, this is the perfect mustard for your brat and pretzel.

Chinese: Super hot. Like, clear-your-sinuses hot. But I mean that in the best way possible. A little bit of this on your egg roll is highly recommended.
your diet.

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Mustard is made by grinding mustard seeds and mixing them into liquid, which helps release the enzymes and oils that give mustard its bite. High-acid liquids, like vinegar, temper the resulting heat but help it keep its pungency, while using something low-acid, like cold water, results in a hotter mustard that can lose its potency relatively quickly.
mustardseedsMUSTARD SEEDS (YELLOW, BROWN, BLACK)
Yellow mustard seeds (also known as white mustard seeds) are the most common and the mildest in flavor. The brown and black seeds tend to be more pungent and are used in varying degrees with yellow seeds to help create different varieties of mustard.

groundmustardMUSTARD POWDER (CRACKED/DAL, YELLOW, CHINESE, ENGLISH)
These are just ground mustard seeds. You can find coarse grinds, but most preground mustard seeds are made into powder. Different brands or types will have different blends of seeds to get varying levels of heat. Mix the powder with vinegar or water until you have a paste, wait about 10-15 minutes for the oils and enzymes to work their magic, and boom, you’ve got homemade mustard.

CLASSICS (DIJON, SPICY BROWN, YELLOW)
yellow
Classic yellow mustard
Yellow Mustard: Aka “American mustard,” this gets its characteristically bright yellow color from turmeric. One of the milder mustards, it’s hugely popular in the U.S. and can be found at most backyard cookouts involving hot dogs or burgers. It’s commonly referred to as just “mustard” by most Americans.

dijon
Dijon mustard
Dijon: The classic French mustard, it’s been around since the 1850s, and originally it swapped in unripe grape juice for vinegar. Nowadays, dijon is made with “white wine.” While Dijon is a region of France that does in fact produce mustard, the term “Dijon” as it applies to mustard is not a protected food name like Champagne, and most Dijon mustard is made outside of France. A lot of recipes that call for mustard use Dijon, as it has a smooth consistency like yellow but a more complex, sharp flavor.

brownmustard
Spicy brown mustard
Spicy Brown: This uses a slightly coarser grind than yellow or Dijon and includes some of the spicier brown mustard seeds in addition to the standard yellow/white seeds. With more heat and deeper flavor than yellow mustard, this is a favorite in many delis, as well as the common New York City hot dog cart. If you’re having some pastrami on rye, this is the mustard you want.

winemustard
Pinot Noir mustard
OTHER WINE MUSTARDS (WHITE BURGUNDY, PINOT NOIR, CHAMPAGNE)
Similar to Dijon mustard, these use specific types of wine to give the mustard a specific flavor that is unique from standard Dijon (which usually lists the nondescript “white wine” as one of its ingredients). If you like Dijon, I highly recommend giving some of these a try.

brownwholegrain
Whole grain stout beer
COARSE MUSTARDS (CREOLE, STONE GROUND, WHOLE GRAIN DIJON, WHOLE GRAIN STOUT, WHOLE GRAIN WHISKY)
Creole, Stone Ground, etc.: These types of mustard use a coarse to chunky grind and usually have some texture in addition to good, deep flavor. Some versions of spicy brown could fall into this category.

Whole Grain: These use whole mustard seeds. Sometimes they’ll use terms like “country” or “old style,” but if this is what you’re going for, you’ll be able to see the whole grains in the jar pretty easily. These have the most texture, obviously, which can add a unique element to sauces and dressings (this is what I like to use in my BBQ sauce).




Mustard is used as a food flavoring, for forage, as an emetic, and diuretic, as well as a topical treatment for inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and rheumatism.
The powdered seeds act as a stimulant to gastric mucosa and increase pancreatic secretions




Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #279 on: September 14, 2019, 12:48:05 PM »


HI

Catmint

You my see this plant on your walks but you may think it is a weed

Nepeta flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae. [same as the common Mint] The genus name is reportedly in reference to Nepete, an ancient Etruscan city. There are about 250 species.
Northern Africa:   Algeria, Morocco,
Europe:   Albania, Andorra, Austria, Bulgaria, Crete, Croatia, Czech Republic, France, Hungary, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Italy, Macedonia FYR, Montenegro, Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovenia, Sardinia, Sicily, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom.

The one on Corfu is Nepeta parnassica [Greek Catmint] and others i will give information about this plant and others

(Nepeta parnassica) Plant Height:12 inches to 18 inches (20-30 cm)  Plant Spread:12 inches to 24 inches Fragrant
Other: Green to gray-green heart shaped leaves appear opposite along the stems. in full the best
Flower Time:Late spring to early Autumn A dark Blue Flower
HABITAT
Roadsides and near streams. Hedgerows, borders of fields, dry banks and waste ground, especially on calcareous and gravelly soils

ALL NEPETA

Some members of this group are known as catnip or catmint because of their effect on house cats – the nepetalactone contained in some Nepeta species binds to the olfactory receptors of cats, typically resulting in temporary euphoria.
Most of the species are herbaceous perennial plants, but some are annuals. They have sturdy stems with opposite heart-shaped, green to gray-green leaves. Nepeta plants are usually aromatic in foliage and flowers.
The tubular flowers can be lavender, blue, white, pink, or lilac, and spotted with tiny lavender-purple dots. The flowers are located in verticillasters grouped on spikes; or the verticillasters are arranged in opposite cymes, racemes, or panicles – toward the tip of the stems.
The fruits are nutlets, which are oblong-ovoid, ellipsoid, ovoid, or obovoid in shape. The surfaces of the nutlets can be slightly ribbed, smooth or warty.
 Nepeta species are cultivated as ornamental plants. They can be drought tolerant – water conserving, often deer repellent, with long bloom periods from late spring to autumn. Some species also have repellent properties to insect pests, including aphids and squash bugs, when planted in a garden. good to have near a Bar-b-Cue
Good for pollinators, such as honey bees.






NONE  A volatile oil, nepetalactone, is present but its exact nature is undefined. It is thought to be an abortificant. The effect of catmint on humans is of a lot less interest than its action on cats where it seems to be a stimulant leading to its being called 'cannabis for cats'.



This plant is edible for humans and it even has some medicinal benefits. The leaves and flowers can be steeped to make tea. Catmint herbal tea has a mild minty taste and a sweet fragrance. Also use cooking and as an herbal
Young leaves - raw. A mint-like flavour, they make an aromatic flavouring in salads. Older leaves are used as a flavouring in cooked foods. They can be used fresh or dried to make an aromatic herb tea. The tea should be infused in a closed container in order to preserve the essential oils, boiling is said to spoil it.
nepeta essential oil
Nepeta cataria is cultivated as an ornamental plant for use in gardens. It is also grown for its attractant qualities to house cats and butterflies. The plant is drought-tolerant and deer-resistant. It can be a repellent for certain insects, including aphids and squash bugs.
Use in Landscape,Gardens,Parks,Pots,Tubs,


Catmint has a long history of use as a household herbal remedy, being employed especially in treating disorders of the digestive system and, as it stimulates sweating, it is useful in reducing fevers. The herbs pleasant taste and gentle action makes it suitable for treating colds, flu and fevers in children. It is more effective when used in conjunction with elder flower (Sambucus nigra). The leaves and flowering tops are strongly antispasmodic, antitussive, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, slightly emmenagogue, refrigerant, sedative, slightly stimulant, stomachic and tonic. The flowering stems are harvested in August when the plant is in full flower, they are dried and stored for use as required. An infusion produces free perspiration, it is considered to be beneficial in the treatment of fevers and colds. It is also very useful in the treatment of restlessness and nervousness, being very useful as a mild nervine for children. A tea made from the leaves can also be used. The infusion is also applied externally to bruises, especially black eyes.




Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #280 on: September 16, 2019, 09:39:15 AM »





HI

Elderberry


Sambucus  is a genus of flowering plants in the family Adoxaceae. The various species are commonly called elder or elderberry. The genus was formerly placed in the honeysuckle family, Caprifoliaceae, but was reclassified as Adoxaceae due to genetic and morphological comparisons to plants in the genus Adoxa.
Depending on the variety and growing conditions, elderberries can reach a height of 6 to 10 feet and width of 6 to 12 feet.
Tall deciduous shrub (though nearly evergreen in mild climates) growing in a variety of conditions
10 species of shrubs and small trees in the family Adoxaceae. Most are native to forested temperate or subtropical areas of both the Northern and Southern hemispheres.
Elderberry can be identified by its leaves, which are oblong and have 'sawtooth' sharply serrated edges. ...
 They bear large clusters of small white or cream-colored flowers in late spring; these are followed by clusters of small black, blue-black, or red berries (rarely yellow or white).
HABITAT
Elder is widespread in many temperate and subtropical regions of the world. It grows in woodland, scrub, hedgerows and on wasteland.
The flowers provide nectar for a variety of insects and the berries are eaten by birds and mammals. Small mammals such as dormice and bank voles eat both the berries and the flowers.
The leaf can be green,yellow,variegated,Purple,
Many moth caterpillars feed on elder foliage, including the white spotted pug, swallowtail, dot moth and buff ermine.
a. At sites in Switzerland and Italy, researchers have uncovered evidence that the black elderberry may have been cultivated by prehistoric man, and there are recipes for elderberry-based medications in the records dating as far back as Ancient Egypt. Historians, however, generally trace the tradition of the elderberry’s healing power back to Hippocrates,
 The ancient Greek known as the “father of medicine,” who described this plant as his “medicine chest” for the wide variety of ailments it seemed to cure.



     


Elderberry (Sambucus nigra L. ssp. ... The seeds, stems, leaves and roots of the Black Elder are all poisonous to humans. They contain a cyanide-inducing glycoside. Eating a sufficient quantity of these cyanide-inducing glycosides can cause a toxic buildup of cyanide in the body and make you quite ill.

Cooked ripe elderberries are perfectly edible. Unripe elderberries are poisonous. Raw berries can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, among other symptoms, so be sure to cook them before eating.



Gin,Jam,Wine,Syrup,Muffings,Wood Art, In landscape,parks,Gardens



The berries and flowers of elderberry are packed with antioxidants and vitamins that may boost your immune system. They can help tame inflammation, lessen stress, and help protect your heart, too. Some experts recommend elderberry to help prevent and ease cold and flu symptoms.
Improve Heart Health
Aid in Digestion
Improve Respiratory Health
Boost Immunity
Improve Bone Health
Skin Care










Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #281 on: September 17, 2019, 08:50:58 AM »


HI

Common Lilac

Syringa vulgaris lilac or common lilac is a species of flowering plant in the olive family Oleaceae,
Grown for its scented pink flowers in spring, this large shrub or small tree is widely cultivated and has been naturalized in parts of Europe and North America. It is not regarded as an aggressive species, found in the wild in widely scattered sites, usually in the vicinity of past or present human habitations.
Syringa vulgaris is a large deciduous shrub or multistemmed small tree, growing to 6–7 m The bark is grey to grey-brown, smooth on young stems,
The flowers have a tubular base to the corolla 6–10 mm long with an open four-lobed apex 5–8 mm across, usually lilac to mauve, occasionally white. They are arranged in dense, terminal panicles 8–18 cm (3–7 in) long. The fruit is a dry, smooth, brown capsule, 1–2 cm long, splitting in two to release the two-winged seeds.
Lilacs—both S. vulgaris and S. × persica the finer, smaller "Persian lilac", now considered a natural hybrid—were introduced into northern European gardens at the end of the 16th century, from Ottoman gardens, not through botanists exploring the Balkan habitats of S. vulgaris. The Holy Roman Emperor's ambassador, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq,
The lilac is a very popular ornamental plant in gardens and parks, because of its attractive, sweet-smelling flowers, which appear in early summer just before many of the roses and other summer flowers come into bloom.
The ideal spot to plant lilacs is in an area with full sun (at least 6 to 8 hours per day)—give them too much shade and they may not bloom. Lilacs also like slightly alkaline, moist, well-drained soil.
Syringa (Lilac) is a genus of about 20 – 25 cultivated species of flowering plants in the olive family (Oleaceae). In addition to the cultivated species of Lilacs, there are many more hybrids, and over 1,000 total varieties of Lilac bushes (along with a few varieties of actual trees).







NONE Lilac bushes (Syringa spp.) are a feast for the eyes and nose, with their large clusters of showy, fragrant flowers. If your pets want to sample a taste of the bush as well, never fear -- the plants are not poisonous to animals and are not toxic to humans at all.



Although not hollow, lilac twigs can be easily drilled out to make flutes and pipe stems. Vulgaris, the species name, means common. Lilac blossoms are edible, though they smell better than they taste, so use in small amounts.
Lilacs are edible, so feel free to top your desserts with them. You can mist a bit of water on the lilacs (freshly picked and clean, do not use lilacs that have been treated with pesticides) and roll them in granulated sugar. Use them to top cupcakes, cakes, cookies, and other desserts.
Freeze them in ice cubes.
Make your own lilac honey.
cosmetics
Landscape,Gardens,Parks
An essential oil


used as a tea or infusion historically it has been used as a anti-periodic. Anti-periodic basically means that it stops the recurrence of disease such as malaria. There has been some studies that indicate a febrifuge action which may help bring down fever.
Treats Skin Problems: Lilac essential oil has many health benefits, and it also helps treat skin problems like cuts, rashes and burns. In fact, the oil also helps treat sunburn. Lilac essential oil promotes glowing and healthy skin.
Place them by a bedside where the aroma can help promote sleep and relaxation. The season for lilacs is so short, so give these uses for lilacs a try.
 The leaves and the fruit are antiperiodic, febrifuge, tonic and vermifuge. The bark or leaves have been chewed by children as a treatment for sore mouth.







Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #282 on: September 18, 2019, 09:18:20 AM »

HI

Banana

You can see this plant near the Galini by the bridge

Banana = Musa basjoo   is an edible fruit – botanically a berry produced by several kinds of large herbaceous flowering plants You can grow this plant in the UK in warm sunny place and cut the leaves off and wrap the stem up in a fleece you will not get big fruit on the plants.
 but the supermarket banana is strictly a plant for heated greenhouses or warm, frost-free climates. Even if hardy bananas survive outdoors they often crop infrequently, if at all.
Bananas do not grow on trees. Rather, they grow from a root structure that produces an above ground stem. The plant is specifically classified as an arborescent (tree-like) perennial herb; in fact, it is the largest herbaceous flowering plant. The banana plant being an herb is that the banana itself is a berry.
In some countries, bananas used for cooking may be called "plantains", distinguishing them from dessert bananas. The fruit is variable in size, color, and firmness, but is usually elongated and curved, with soft flesh rich in starch covered with a rind, which may be green, yellow, red, purple, or brown when ripe. The fruits grow in clusters hanging from the top of the plant. Almost all modern edible seedless (parthenocarp) bananas come from two wild species – Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana.
The term "banana" is also used as the common name for the plants that produce the fruit. This can extend to other members of the genus Musa, such as the scarlet banana (Musa coccinea), the pink banana (Musa velutina), and the Fe'i bananas. It can also refer to members of the genus Ensete, such as the snow banana (Ensete glaucum) and the economically important false banana (Ensete ventricosum). Both genera are in the banana family, Musaceae.
 Cultivated banana plants vary in height depending on the variety and growing conditions. Most are around 5 m (16 ft) tall, with a range from 'Dwarf Cavendish' plants at around 3 m (10 ft) to 'Gros Michel' at 7 m (23 ft) or more. Leaves are spirally arranged and may grow 2.7 metres (8.9 ft) long and 60 cm (2.0 ft) wide.
The word banana is thought to be of West African origin, possibly from the Wolof word banaana, and passed into English via Spanish or Portuguese
Wolof  is a language of Senegal, the Gambia and Mauritania, and the native language of the Wolof people. Like the neighbouring languages Serer and Fula, it belongs to the Senegambian branch of the Niger–Congo language family. Unlike most other languages of the Niger-Congo family, Wolof is not a tonal language.
The vast majority of the world's bananas today are cultivated for family consumption or for sale on local markets.
HABITAT
Banana plants grow in the humid, tropical regions of Central and South America, Africa, and Southeast Asia where there are high temperatures and rainfall. Modern agricultural technologies also enable people to cultivate banana plants in non-tropical regions such as California in the United States.







NONE
Allergic reactions to banana vary widely and can include itching of the mouth and throat, itchy rash (hives, urticaria), skin or mucosal swellings (angioedema), and in rare cases narrowing of the throat, wheezing, and even collapse. In most cases, symptoms begin within seconds or minutes of eating the fruit.



You can eat edible sweet bananas.
You can eat edible banana fruit peels.
You can even eat the stem.
You can use stem fibres as natural craft materials.
You can use banana plant fibres to make garments.
Banana leaves can be used as natural leaf platters.
Steamed banana leaves can be used for packing your lunch.
You can use steamed banana leaves to make wrapped desserts.
Banana flowers are edible.
wine making
Bread
Ice cream
Wrap fish in the leaves to be steamed
The banana is versatile


Various parts of banana act as food medicines for treatment of diseases like diabetes, hypertension, cancer, ulcers, diarrhoea, urolithiasis, Alzheimer's and infections. Other medicinal uses are in surgical dressing, pain relief, food and pharmaceuticals, nano medicine, pollution control, apoptosis and cell cycle
Bananas Contain Many Important Nutrients
Bananas Contain Nutrients That Moderate Blood Sugar Levels
Bananas May Improve Digestive Health
Bananas Contain Powerful Antioxidants
Help You Feel More Full
Unripe Bananas May Improve Insulin Sensitivity
Bananas May Improve Kidney Health














Offline kevin-beverly

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #283 on: Yesterday at 12:03:18 PM »


You wake up another nice day put your hiking boots on or just your Trainers put water bottles in your rucksack and off you go with your Arillas Map in hand deciding what walk you are going to take.
Down the road you go taking a side road and down a old grass foot path you see wild flowers and Olive trees also might see a honey buzzard circling around high in the sky.
Something rustles in the long grass you wonder what it is a Mouse,Snake.or a Lizard All harmless.
You see one of Corfus big Swallowtail butterfly,Bees landing on flowers.
And hear the cicadas making a load of nose do you try and look for them and you wonder why they make such nose well i shall try explain


CICADA

[si ka da] cicadas  are a superfamily, the Cicadoidea, of insects in the order Hemiptera (true bugs). They are in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, along with smaller jumping bugs such as leafhoppers and froghoppers. The superfamily is divided into two families, Tettigarctidae, with two species in Australia, and Cicadidae, with more than 3,000 species described from around the world; many species remain undescribed.
, cicadas don't bite or sting so they're not harmful to pets. Cicadas generally leave no lasting damage (except possibly to young trees and shrubs). When ingested, they can potentially result in some stomach upset in dogs and cats, as the exoskeleton may be difficult to digest.
The cicada is an ancient polyvalent symbol: resounding themes are resurrection, immortality, spiritual realization and spiritual ecstasy.
Some Greeks say if you get one in the house it's LUCKY
They typically live in trees, feeding on watery sap from xylem tissue and laying their eggs in a slit in the bark. Most cicadas are cryptic. The vast majority of species are active during the day as adults, with some calling at dawn or dusk and only a rare few species are known to be nocturnal. The periodic cicadas spend most of their lives as underground nymphs, emerging only after 13 or 17 years, , cicadas emerge from the ground as nymphs. Nymphs climb the nearest available tree, and begin to shed their nymph exoskeleton
Crickets make sound by rubbing their wings together (not its legs!), and cicadas have a special organ called a tymbal that produces sound. The tymbal contains a series of ribs that buckle one after the other when the cicada flexes its muscles. Every time a rib buckles, the rib produces a click.
Cicadas usually sing during the heat of the day. In addition to attracting a mate, the loud noise actually repels birds. The cicada's song is painful to the birds' ears and interferes with their communication, making it difficult for the birds to hunt in groups.
The sounds that they make are far from random, though. Cicadas make their clicking and chirping noises quite intentionally, and they serve a very specific purpose. The songs are a mating call. Males make these calls in order to draw females toward them when they need to mate.
Cicadas are great at clinging to tree trunks and making loud screeching sounds by vibrating their bodies. But these bulky, red-eyed insects aren't so great at flying. The reason why may lie in the chemistry of their wings, a new study shows.

After mating, do cicadas die of starvation? Horton: “Adult cicadas have piercing sucking mouth parts and they feed on xylem of plants for their nutritional value. I would say they die simply because their life cycle has expired
In some species of cicada, the males remain in one location and call to attract females. Sometimes several males aggregate and call in chorus. In other species, the males move from place to place, usually with quieter calls while searching for females. The Tettigarctidae differ from other cicadas in producing vibrations in the substrate rather than audible sounds.[9] After mating, the female cuts slits into the bark of a twig where she deposits her eggs
Cicadas are featured in the well-known protest song "Como La Cigarra" ("Like the Cicada") written by Argentinian poet and composer María Elena Walsh. In the song, the cicada is a symbol of survival and defiance against death. The song was famously recorded by Mercedes Sosa, among other Latin American musicians. Another well-known song, "La Cigarra" ("The Cicada"), written by Raymundo Perez Soto, is a song in the mariachi tradition that romanticises the insect as a creature that sings until it dies
Ancient Greeks use to eat Cicadas







Leave a comment Please to Let me know if this was a interesting facts thanks




Offline Billy M

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Re: Walking around corfu
« Reply #284 on: Yesterday at 03:03:33 PM »

It’s good. Do you remember mum told me she wrote in to the really wild show to find out what that chirping sound is mum was about five she got no answer

Billy m