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Photo Gallery Board / Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Last post by soniaP on Today at 11:37:04 PM »
Hi is for hedgehog

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Photo Gallery Board / Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Last post by soniaP on Today at 11:33:23 PM »
For is for fire extinguisher in a tree. Love the health and safety in Arllas


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Photo Gallery Board / Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Last post by soniaP on Today at 11:29:23 PM »
E is Enplu restaurant in Corfu own. Taken from the old fort

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Photo Gallery Board / Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Last post by soniaP on Today at 11:22:18 PM »
D is for dancers

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Photo Gallery Board / Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Last post by Eggy on Today at 12:26:50 PM »
C...... corn , part of last year's good crop , from Kavaddades Garden

Negg
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HI
B FOR BENCH getting a bit wet

kev sep 2014
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Photo Gallery Board / Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Last post by kevin-beverly on Yesterday at 10:36:10 AM »


HI

A FOR AWESOME SUNSET

kev sep 2009
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Walking in Arillas and north west Corfu / Re: Walking around corfu
« Last post by kevin-beverly on March 23, 2019, 10:49:41 AM »


HI

Tree Houseleek

Other common names are tree aeonium or Irish rose  is a succulent, subtropical subshrub in the flowering plant family Crassulaceae the latin name is Aeonium arboreum. This drought-tolerant plant hates water around its roots,
I have seen this plant growing near Afionas.
 It is native to the hillsides of the Canary Islands, where it is known as bejeque arboreo and introduced in the Mediterranean It bears rosettes of leaves and large pyramidal panicles of bright yellow flowers in the spring. In temperate regions it needs to be grown under glass
The succulent leaves are typically arranged on a basal stem, in a dense, spreading rosette. A feature which distinguishes this genus from many of its relatives is the manner in which the flowers bear free petals, and are divided into 6 or 12 sections . Each rosette produces a central inflorescence only once, and then dies back (though it will usually branch or offset to produce
Much hybridising has been done, resulting in several cultivars of mixed or unknown parentage. Of these, the following have gained the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit:-
The genus name comes from the ancient Greek "aionos" (ageless)
habitat: Aeonium arboreum is a subtropical succulent sub-shrub native to the hillsides of the Canary Islands where their natural range includes arid desert regions.
 Aeonium arboreum is a treelike in that its woody stems branch out freely, but it is unlikely to exceed 90cm (3 feet) in height. The 5-8cm (2-3 inch) long leaves of its rosettes are spoon-shaped and shiny green.
Aeonium. Aeonium is a genus of about 35 species of succulent, subtropical plants . Many species are popular in horticulture.






NONE Aeonium arboreum has no toxic effects reported.


Aeonium arboreum has no particular known value to wildlife.
grow in gardens Beds and Borders, Patio and Containers  parks and wasteland and sand dunes


Iconic succulent plants. Succulent plants possess specialised water-storing tissues that give them a unique ability to maintain photosynthesis and other metabolic processes during droughts. ...
Exploring the natural capital of Aloe
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Photo Gallery Board / Re: A to Z - Photographs of Arillas and Corfu
« Last post by kevin-beverly on March 21, 2019, 09:17:49 AM »


HI



Z FOR A FEW Zs

Billy Kaloudis with beverly sound asleep we all had a good day out at Erikoussa on Billy's boat

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Walking in Arillas and north west Corfu / Re: Walking around corfu
« Last post by kevin-beverly on March 20, 2019, 08:58:47 AM »


HI

European searocket

Cakile maritima Family:Brassicaceae is a common plant in the mustard family. It is widespread in Europe
It can now be found in many other areas of the world where it has been introduced.  It has white to light purple flowers and sculpted, segmented, corky brown fruits one to three centimeters long. The fruits float and are water-dispersed It is a glabrous, succulent annual, with a slender or stout taproot. It has a branched stem prostrate or ascending, growing up to 15–45 cm
Habitat
It grows on the foreshores near large dune systems, and in shingle banks. It is tolerant of salt spray and transient seawater inundation. It is pollinated by a wide range of insects,





UNKNOWN NONE

Leaves, stems, flower buds and immature seedpods - raw or cooked. They are rich in vitamin C but have a very bitter taste.
. Used mainly as a flavouring. Very young leaves can be added to salads whilst older leaves can be mixed with milder tasting leaves and used as a potherb.
Root - dried and ground into a powder, then mixed with cereal flours and used to make bread. A famine food, it is only used in times of scarcity.



UNKNOWN



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